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Ki Seitzei: Zchus Harabim

Moshe Rabbeinu was the single greatest human being who ever lived. The Rambam tells us that of all the navi’im, he alone was able to speak to HASHEM directly. Normally, a prophet must go into an altered state of consciousness to experience HASHEM. Otherwise the experience would cause sensory overload, and he would die. Moshe was able to speak to HASHEM in a totally clear, conscious state of mind. At any time, he could approach…






Ki Seitzei: The Greatness of Man

The punishment of stoning Of the four capital punishments in the Torah, the most severe is s’kilah. After being killed, the criminal is hung publicly for all to see so that others will learn not to do as he did. Yet the Torah warns us that his body should not remain hanging for too long. He must be buried that day because it is an embarrassment to the King to let him hang. Rashi explains:…






Ki Seitzei: Outcomes and Intentions

The Torah commands us in various safeguards. One is the obligation to erect a fence. If you construct a house with a flat roof, you are required to put up a fence, to prevent people from falling off. Rashi notes that the Torah uses an unusual expression, “Because the “faller” will fall.” He is called the “faller” because he was slated to die. The Torah is telling us, that was his fate. Nevertheless, you should…






Ki Seitzei: I Would Be the First to Thank Hashem

Our attitude toward the Mitzrim The Torah lays out our attitude and approach to the different nations and tells us, “The Mitzrim cannot be totally rejected because you lived in their country.” Rashi is bothered by this mixed expression. If we are supposed to be grateful for the good that the Mitzrim did for us, why use the expression “don’t reject them?” This doesn’t sound very appreciative. Rashi answers that the Torah is teaching us…






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